Library Artist-in-Residence Program: Terrain Walker

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We are thrilled to introduce one of two Resident Artists who will be joining us during the 2020-2021 year in the Library .  Each year, we select artists from different disciplines across the college to take up residency in the library, allowing for studio space,  exhibition opportunities, new projects, and  collaboration.

Terrain Walker II (Tj) is a photographer and writer based out of Chicago, IL. Before photography he also dabbled in graphic design, video editing, and making photomontages. Around the age of 15 he took multiple photography classes that elevated his love for the artform. He dropped everything else and fully committed becoming a photographer. He currently studies photography at Columbia College Chicago while also adding new skills to his repertoire.  When he’s not out taking photos you could most likely find him reading, competing in fighting games, getting tattooed, playing Dungeons and Dragons, or watching anime. 

Photography Instagram – @/tlw.ii 

Website: https://www.terrainwalkerii.com/ 

Twitter: @/tlw.ii 
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 We are very excited that you are joining the Library this year as one of our Artists in Residence. Can you speak a bit about your background as an artist and what brought you to Columbia?  I’ve been an artist for as long as I can remember but as of the last six or so years, I’ve been completely enamored with photography (With some writing and design sprinkled in here and there too). Columbia felt like the perfect choice for me to continue my career as an artist due to the unconventional college environment. The city of Chicago being considered my campus was much more compelling to me as opposed to the standard college campus.  

What initially inspired you to apply for the Library Artist in Residence Position?

My first semester here at Columbia I took a fashion class. The former artist in residency, Julia Arrendondo, was one of the TA’s for that class. And that’s where I met her and discovered her work as an artist for the first. The semester after that we connected a bit and she’s personally helped me out with multiple projects. She encouraged me to apply for the position which I was hesitant about at first, but after a while I realized the resources and space I would be provided with would help me out a lot. 

We were very excited to see that you work in various mediums (visual arts, writing) in your creative practice, especially since we always try to emphasize the Library as a place for interdisciplinary synergy to happen.  How do you feel working across mediums informs your work?  

Working with both writing and visual arts has always been an interesting thing to me. I’ve always loved doing both in one way or another. Both mediums work perfectly fine on their own, but I think when text and image are used in conjunction with each other they can create amazing works of art. I don’t always include writing with my work but when I do my ideas and final products are usually at their best. 


Can you speak a bit to your experience of libraries in general—school, public, academic–how it relates to both your personal education and development as an artist?

Libraries have always been an important part of my life in one way or another. I first started to really love reading because of the library in elementary school. My experience with libraries gets a lot more personal in high school. Highschool was a weird and stressful time for me in more than one way. The school library was always a haven for me to read or work on projects with a peaceful state of mind. Plus, I had a good relationship with my librarian around junior year.  She helped me get back into reading which is something I really needed at the time. After graduation, I went on to work at a library for a while before college. It gave me the opportunity to see how helpful libraries could be from an insider perspective and it helped me learn to interact with different people as an artist.

What do you hope to gain from your Residency in the Library this coming year?  

My want to continue to develop and evolve as an artist overall. After one year of being in downtown Chicago my art has already vastly improved from where it was. Now that I have this residency, I feel that I’ll grow just as much if not more because of that. I also always hope to be meeting new artists and just people in general. I love collaborating with others, but I haven’t had the chance to do that too much recently. 

What are your current and future projects?  What should we look forward to from you next?

I’m currently working on/conceptualizing multiple short and long term projects. Right now, I’m working on collaboration project with a friend that will tell a story in three parts using only photos. My current long-term project is called “Impressions”. I’m going to be interviewing tattoo artists and collectors about their relationships with tattoos and tattoo culture as well as taking portraits of them. Hopefully over the course of the next year I’ll be collaborating with more musicians on things like album covers and promotional shoots as well.  These projects are where my focus is at right now but, I’m always writing and documenting life around me so new things come up constantly. 
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Watch for an interview with our second Resident Artists, Laura Hawbaker, soon…

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS | ARTIVISM 2020 BLACK LIVES MATTER EXHIBIT DL October 7th!

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 Attention Chicago Artists and Activists!In preparation for our Fall 2020 focus topic, ARTIVISM 2020 we are mounting an interactive exhibit on the Library’s first floor featuring artwork created for and/or inspired by the recent BLM Protests in Chicago and across the country    Inspired by the evolving art gallery that has taken over the fences surrounding the White House in D.C., we are covering our first floor walls with protest artwork, signage, printed matter, ephemera, and more.,.We are hoping to create an exhibit that will be up through the Fall Semester that reinforces the relationships between protest and artwork, as well as captures an important historic moment in both.


Deadline:    Extended to October 7th!

We are seeking work from all corners of the Chicago arts  community.  To submit  to the exhibit, e-mail kbowen@colum.edu (subject line: BLM Exhibit) with 3-5 images of your work  . We will work with you to arrange drop-off and/or installation details in September.  The end exhibit will be both virtual and physical, with opportunities for contributing artists to engage in panel discussions, interviews, and more throughout the semester.Share

Votes for Women | A Portrait in Persistence

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Visit the Library’s 5th Floor for VOTES FOR WOMEN, a poster exhibit chronicling women’s suffrage created by the Smithsonian Museum, and check out our collection of writings by women suffragists in the 5th Floor display case (near the scores collection). 

Stop at the 1st Floor Circulation desk to pick up a browse pass to visit the 5th floor.. 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence                                                                  

“Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” will outline the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. The presentation is divided chronologically and thematically to address “Radical Women: 1832–1869,” “Women Activists: 1870–1892,” “The New Woman: 1893–1912,” “Compelling Tactics: 1913–1916,” “Militancy in the American Suffragist Movement: 1917–1919” and “The Nineteenth Amendment and Its Legacy.” These thematic explorations are complemented by a chronological narrative of visual biographies of some of the movement’s most influential leaders.

On view will be portraits of the movement’s pioneers, notably Susan B. Anthony and abolitionist Sojourner Truth, and 1848 Seneca Falls participants, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucy Stone. Other portraits of activists will represent such figures as Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for President; Carrie Chapman Catt, who devised successful state-by-state persuasion efforts; Alice Paul, who organized the first-ever march on Washington’s National Mall; and Lucy Burns, who served six different prison sentences for picketing the White House.

“Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” will also shed light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote). Portraits of African American contributors to the movement include Sarah Remond, who filed one of the earliest lawsuits protesting race segregation; Ida B. Wells, who advocated for federal laws against lynching; and Mary Church Terrell, who established the National Association of Colored Women.

The Portrait Gallery exhibition tells this complex history through an array of early photographic portraits, paintings, engravings, works on paper, lithographs, video, newspapers, postcards, books, ballots, banners, fliers, a china set, embroidery and pennants. Viewers will be able to see authentic objects, including original banners from the National Woman’s Party, a late-19th century ballot box and original writings by influential suffragists.

The exhibition is curated by Kate Clarke Lemay, historian and director of Portal, Portrait Gallery’s Scholarly Center, National Portrait Gallery.

to learn more, visit: https://npg.si.edu/exhibition/votes-for-women

Constitution Day 2020 : Columbia VOTES

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Each year, Columbia College Chicago celebrates Constitution Day on September 17th.  It is a day to learn about the Constitution, its history and to understand how it has and continues to shape the direction of our country.  This year, the Constitution Day event will be held on ZOOM, and the focus is on the importance of the student vote.  The Library is collaborating with Columbia Votes to encourage our students to fully participate during this important election year.

Columbia Votes is a college-wide initiative launched by Sharon Bloyd-Peshkin, Associate Professor in the Communication Department. Voter Registration Geniuses Anna Busalacchi and Ally Longo (students working directly with Columbia Votes) will be presenting. Our goal for this event is to encourage all students to vote. This program is designed to help with the voting process, including registration, voting by mail, where/when to vote, etc. We recognize the importance of student voices to the future of democracy. Every vote counts. 

Formal presentations will begin at 10am and 10:30am, with time for Q&A during each session.  Attendees will be able to join and exit as schedules permit. This program is open to the Columbia College Chicago community.  #VOTE

ZOOM: https://colum.zoom.us/s/98439216534

Or join webinar with the following methods:

Phone one-tap: US: +13126266799,,98439216534# or +13017158592,,98439216534#

Join by Telephone

For higher quality, dial a number based on your current location.

Dial:  US : +1 312 626 6799 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 646 876 9923 or +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 669 900 6833

Webinar ID:        984 3921 6534

International numbers

Original first page of the U.S. Constitution. Source: United States National Archives

New Library Search and Systems!

image of the new library search interface on the homepage
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We are happy to announce that a new Library Search has launched on the library homepage.  The new Library Search features a drop-down menu so you can select the format of material you are looking for – Books, Articles, Video, Audio, Journals, and Newspapers. You also have the option to search Everything – all formats – in the system.

While an Everything Search will connect you to most of the materials and resources provided by the library, there are a few things it will not connect you to like our image databases or statistical and data analysis databases. If you are searching library resources but not finding the materials you need or expect, do not hesitate to reach out to a librarian using the Ask a Librarian chat or email on the library website.

The following video provides more information on the features and functionality of our new search:

Why did we create a new Library Search?

Earlier this summer, the library launched a new catalog and discovery system to help Columbia College Chicago students, faculty, and staff find and access library resources. This change was driven by our state-wide library consortium, CARLI (Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois). All 90+ libraries in the consortium are now using the new catalog and discovery system.

A new library search was created to better connect users to the new catalog and discovery system.

Any more changes?

In addition to the changes that have already happened, there is one more change to anticipate in the future. This change will provide us with a new authentication system for accessing all the library’s online resources – our streaming video, articles, e-books, streaming audio, databases, etc. The new authentication system will connect to your Columbia Office 365 account which means that access will be more seamless than before. The library will be part of the college’s single sign on system.

This new authentication system will also change the direct links you use to access library materials. For example, if you use a direct link to a library film, e-book, or article or if you share library links with students via Canvas, these links will need to be updated. You don’t need to do anything now – all your library links will continue to work through the Fall semester and into January. We will provide additional updates via the blog and website when you need to begin changing your library links.

As always, you can direct any questions about the changes to library systems or to the new Library Search to our Ask a Librarian chat or email.

Resource Round-Up | Tips for Creating Your Perfect Workspace At Home

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With many artists working from home this fall, we bring you a list of excellent resources and inspiration on creating your ideal workspace wherever you may land.

 

Here’s Everything You’ll Need to Set Up Your Own Home Art Studio

12 Ways to Make an Art Studio At Home

How to Set Up A Home Art Studio on A Budget

No where to Paint?  Top Tips for Making ANYWHERE your Art Studio

Creative Corners:  Incredible and Inspiring Home Art Studios

Creating Art in Small Studios

44 Stunning Art Studios That Will Inspire You To Get Back to Work

Where We Create:  A Look Inside Real Life Craft Rooms and Art Studios

Art Studio Ideas:  How to Design Beautiful Small Spaces Expanding Creative Horizons

Five Awesome Home Art Studio Ideas

What Stuff Do You Need for An Art Studio?

A Home Printmaking Studio Space

 

Digital Display | Protest, Activism, and Graffiti

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Protest Graffiti :  Mexico : Oaxaca

Walls of Freedom:  Street Art of the Egyptian Revolution

Bomb It!

Trespass :  A History of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Revolution Graffiti:  Street Art of the New Egypt

Banksy:  The Bristol Legacy

On the Wall: Four Decades of Community Murals in New York City

The Art of Rebellion 2 :  The World of Urban Art Activism

Crimes of Style:  Urban Graffiti and the Politics of Criminality

Graffiti and Street Art:  Reading, Writing, and Representing the City

Written on the City:  Graffiti Messages Worldwide

Destroy this Memory

Radical Media:  Rebellious Communication and Social Movements

Street Art, Public City:  Law, Crime, and the Urban Imagination

 

Digital Display: Activism and Documentary Film

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Human Rights Film Festivals

Female Agency and Documentary Strategies: Subjectivities, Identity and Activism

American Documentary Film: Projecting the Nation

Film & Every Day Eco Disasters

Video for Change: A Guide for Activism and Advocacy

Story Movements:  How Documentaries Empower People and Inspire Social Change

Remaking Reality:  US Documentary Culture after 1945

Post 1990 Documentary: Reconfiguring independence

ARTIVISM 2020| Black Lives Matter Call for Submissions

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS | ARTIVISM 2020 BLACK LIVES MATTER EXHIBIT

 Attention Chicago Artists and Activists!

In preparation for our Fall 2020 focus topic, ARTIVISM 2020 we are mounting an interactive exhibit on the Library’s first floor featuring artwork created for and/or inspired by the recent BLM Protests in Chicago and across the country    Inspired by the evolving art gallery that has taken over the fences surrounding the White House in D.C., we are covering our first floor walls with protest artwork, signage, printed matter, ephemera, and more.,.We are hoping to create an exhibit that will be up through the Fall Semester that reinforces the relationships between protest and artwork, as well as captures an important historic moment in both.
Deadline:  September 25th, 2020
We are seeking work from all corners of the Chicago arts  community.  To submit  to the exhibit, e-mail kbowen@colum.edu (subject line: BLM Exhibit) with 3-5 images of your work  . We will work with you to arrange drop-off and/or installation details in September.  The end exhibit will be both virtual and physical, with opportunities for contributing artists to engage in panel discussions, interviews, and more throughout the semester.

Digital Display: 10 Books on Performance and Activism

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Women, Dance, and Revolution: Performance and Protest in the Southern Mediterranean

Aids, Social Protest, and Theater:  Performance as Protest

Landscapes of Dissent:  Guerilla Poetry & Public Space

The Politics of Performance: Radical Theatre As Cultural intervention

Taking It To the Streets: The Social Protest Theater of Luis Valdez and Amiri Baraka

Vietnam Protest Theater: The Television War on Stage

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised:  Protest Music After Fukushima

Ricanness: Enduring Time in Anti-Colonial Performance

Readings in Performance and Ecology

Acts of Gaiety: LGBT Performance and the Politics of Pleasure